Decho Taralejkov

Decho Taralejkov

01.11.1929 г. - 14.01.2002 г.

Kazanlak - Bulgaria

composer, arranger, singer

Decho Taralejkov graduated from the Law Faculty of Sofia  University in 1951 and from the State Academy of Music in 1955 majoring in Clarinet. He studied Composition with Professor Alexander Raychev.  He worked as editor-in-chief of the show programmes of the Bulgarian National Television  in the 1960s and 1970s, deputy editor-in-chief of the Music Department of the Bulgarian National Radio (1977-84), director of the Variety Art Section and director of The Golden Orpheus Festival (1984-1989).         

In the 1950s he played in various orchestras such as the orchestra of Sofia Town Council conducted by Hristo Vuchkov or the orchestra of the Theatre for Satire conducted by Bentzion Eliezer. During the period he started making orchestral arrangements and in the 1960s won recognition as one of the leading orchestral arrangers  in the field of Bulgarian light music. His first song Old Truth was performed by Biser Kirov. In the 1980s he collaborated with the bands Signal and Phonoexpress. He conducted  the Big Band of the Bulgarian National Radio and many times was responsible for editing and writing the scenario of the TV festival Melody of the Year and The Golden Orpheus Festival.     

He composed a symphony poem-requiem “Perushtitsa 1876”; over 250 arrangements and orchestrations of pop songs, operettas, theatre music, TV musical plays etc.

Works

TV musical plays:

Krivorazbranata tzivilizatzia (Phoney Civilisation); Vrajaletz (Healer).

Awarded songs:

Hey You, Spring (1979).

We, the Old Sailors, performed by Biser Kirov (second prize at the competition Songs for the Sea, Burgas and its Working People).

Awarded arrangements at:

The Golden Orpheus Festival:

The Thief of Pearls (music by Dimitar Valchev) (first prize,1967).

Awarded songs arranged by him at:

The Golden Orpheus Festival:

I Had a Dream (music by Atanas Boyadjiev) (the Grand Prix, 1969); Late Meetings (music by Petar Stupel); One Bulgarian Rose; Dedication (music to both by Dimitar Valchev).